Category: Arts and Letters

The Book in the Mirror OR THE CASE OF THE EATEN SAILORS

Apparent coincidences form vital wholes gaping in the net ofphysical causality, through which deus ex machina manifestshis volition; they are tears in the fabric of reality through whichDestiny and Fate seep through. Arthur Koestler Who is this? It is a man in a suit with wavy hair, standing in front

The Village Notary
A Hungarian Classic Resurrected in Translation

If the literary translator’s fundamental motive is the desire to share with others his delight in the strangeness of alien things, the re-translator’s purpose is more complex. He (allowing the masculine to do duty for both genders!) shares the first translator’s enthusiasm, but more is clearly needed. He may be

THE MOST INFLUENTIAL ART CRITIC IN THE AGE OF EMPEROR FRANZ JOSEPH

Ludwig Hevesi, the Hungarian-born art critic, is probably best known as the author of the motto that graces the facade of the Secession Building in Karlsplatz in resplendent golden letters: ‘Der Zeit ihre Kunst, der Kunst ihre Freiheit!’ or ‘To every age its art, to every art its freedom!’ Hevesi,

VIENNA AS A CULTURAL METROPOLIS IN THE AGE
OF EMPEROR FRANZ JOSEPH*

Even though the imperial city has been a favourite research topic and inexhaustible training ground for cultural historians for forty years, this now globally fashionable curiosity has been rather selective, revolving around a handful of leitmotifs and approaching the same favourite themes over and over again. The book to which

STOCKS OF LOVE—A PORTRAIT OF ISTVÁN SZEPSY

Film Snapshots of the Man Who Redefined the Tokaj Wine Region István Szepsy is a member of the sixteenth generation of a winegrowing dynasty in Tokaj, which first left an indelible mark on Hungary’s cultural and  economic  history  in  the  early  seventeenth  century.  Although  I        have been following Szepsy’s work

THE INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES KŐSZEG

Ferenc Miszlivetz and Jody Jensen in interview with Mátyás Kohán MK: The Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg (iASK) is now five years old. Could you sketch a guide to how to found a research facility of that rank in a modest little city in the Hungarian countryside? JJ: Our group

LÁSZLÓ MAGYAR—UNTOLD STORIES OF A HUNGARIAN EXPLORER
BORN TWO HUND

Part II MAGYAR’S RECEPTION IN HUNGARY AND ABROAD Owing to his Hungarian patriotism, and—having been an illegitimate child— his family circumstances and upbringing (he wanted to prove himself to his father), he insisted on publishing his books and other writings in Hungarian, despite offers from Portugal and Britain. Consequently, although

SOPRON – A TRAVEL ESSAY

First we heard what sounded like gunfire, then came a shrieking sound like a festive rocket being launched. Only then did we see rising in the sky above the vines a great murmuration of starlings, circling and swirling in great arcs, coming together, coming apart, reforming. Thousands of starlings in

SZÉPHALOM – THE UTOPIA OF AN ENGLISH GARDEN – PART I

Ferenc Kazinczy, as an enthusiastic amateur and knowledgeable connoisseur, has long been synonymous with horticulture in Hungary, and in particular with the art of the English landscape garden. The profound effect that this new art form, which swept through Hungary at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries, had

‘SURVIVING WITH HONOUR’ – NOTES ABOUT GÉZA PÁSKÁNDI

The figure of Géza Páskándi will always remain for me the one I remember from Budapest in early 1974, shortly after his expatriation from Romania. Forty-one years old then, he could have been, in appearance, an artist from anywhere in Western Europe, in his black leather jacket and his black