Ferenc Hörcher

Ferenc Hörcher

FERENC HÖRCHER (Budapest, 1964) is a philosopher, intellectual historian, poet, critic, legal theorist and political analyst. His interests in philosophy include political philosophy and the philosophy of art. His interests in intellectual history include early modern political thought, early modern aesthetic thought and most recently, the history of modern Hungarian and Central European political thought. He published four volumes of poetry, all in Hungarian. He published a volume of essays on 20th century Hungarian prose writer Géza Ottlik. Besides teaching (Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Eötvös Loránd University, and the Jagiellonian University in Kraków) and researching at the Institute of Philosophy of the Hungarian Academy of Science, he is interested in politics, the cultural life in a comparative perspective, Catholic higher education and the socio-political organisation of the arts and science. Currently, he is Head of the Research Institute of Politics and Government at the National University of Public Service, Budapest.

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY IN A TIME OF PANDEMIC – PART I–II

Part I: Under the Impact of the First Shock, Mid-March* Millennia of human history have shown that serious epidemics are often accompanied by political uncertainty: they can redraw political frontiers, realign priorities, or even provoke war and revolution. In recent decades, however, it had seemed as though we were escaping

FAREWELL TO ROGER SCRUTON – THE CLASSIC OF CONTEMPORARY BRITISH CONSERVATISM

In the last decade of his life Sir Roger Scruton embodied the tradition of British conservatism. Everyone knows: the Right Honourable Edmund Burke was the founding father of British conservatism, and Sir Roger Scruton its contemporary classic. Between them there was Michael Oakeshott. The three of them – Burke, Oakeshott,

THE GLAMOUR OF TRUE THOUGHTS

Ferenc Hörcher, political philosopher, editor of the Hungarian website Mos Maiorum, spoke with the English philosopher about the European intellectual elite, the Hungarian national identity, and why the IMF agreement might diminish sovereignty but may also prove advantageous for Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. Mos Maiorum: Professor Scruton, let us first talk