Category: History

Memory, Commemoration, Crisis

Fulbright, Arkansas, and the Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Fulbright Program, 1946–2021 Part II Fulbright Program anniversaries have been plagued by crises every twenty-five years. In 1971, a dramatic 40 per cent cut in its budget—caused by the crushing pressure military spending for the Vietnam War put on all ‘non-essential’ expenditures

SAINT STEPHEN SCHOOL IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE

Tamás Krump, a Hungarian Christian, Founds a Schoolin the Most Populous Muslim Country in the World In 2001, I sojourned at a parish home led by the Jesuit Father István Jaschkó in Taiwan. I strolled through the rooms of the institution, noting the tender care lavished on every aspect of

Memory, Commemoration, Crisis

Fulbright, Arkansas, and the Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Fulbright Program, 1946–2021 Part I The commemoration of a program that is as well established and well-known as the Fulbright Program is problematic even under the best circumstances. The post-Second-World-War origins of the Fulbright Program are distant; its history and architecture are

RANZ FERDINAND
HAD NOT DIED IN SARAJEVO

A Counterfactual History of Hungary, 1914–1919* Alternative or counterfactual history is not merely fiction or wishful thinking. According to E. H. Carr in his seminal What is History? (1961), the historian’s task is to ‘explain why one course was eventually chosen rather than another’. But while he—like so many other

THOMAS MOLNÁR’S LIFELONG
STRUGGLE AGAINST MODERNISM

János Pánczél Hegedűs in interview with Gergely Szilvay Currently, the main problem of the right is that it is paralysed and it feels it has to meet the expectations of the left, says János Pánczél Hegedűs, after Thomas Molnár, the Hungarian- born American philosopher who passed away in 2010, and

LEADERSHIP IN WAR

Winston Churchill had no doubts about the importance of studying history: ‘In history lie all the secrets of statecraft.’ This includes its subset, leadership in war. Great war leaders, as Andrew Roberts points out in Leadership in War (2019),1 drawing on the examples of their predecessors, have the ability to

REFLECTIONS ON ‘A NATION DISMEMBERED’

“But obligations are reciprocal. Those who gained at Trianon have obligations as well. Their obligation is to shape countries with an absolute minimum of injustice so that they can ask for loyalty from the citizens placed wholesale under their sovereignty without asking that they surrender their souls too.” We are