Gergely Egedy

Gergely Egedy

GERGELY EGEDY (Budapest, 1953), historian and political scientist, university professor. He teaches at the newly founded National University of Public Service. He specialises in the history of political thought and British history. His major works include Nagy-Britannia története (A History of Great Britain, 1998, 2011); Konzervativizmus az ezredfordulón (Conservatism at the Turn of the Millennium, 2001); Brit konzervatív gondolkodás és politika (British Conservative Thought and Politics, 2005); Bevezetés a nemzetközi kapcsolatok elméletébe (An Introduction to the Theory of International Relations, 2007, 2011).

THE ‘ANGLOSPHERE’ – AN ALTERNATIVE TO EUROPE?

The British and European supporters of preserving Britain’s EU-membership have gone to almost any length in the referendum campaign to emphasise that Britain has in fact no alternative to Europe. As Hugo Young put it in his work on the troubled history of British– EU relations: “This is the story

MINORITIES VERSUS MAJORITIES – MULTICULTURALISM IN RETREAT

“The essential problem is not the political issue of European federation or the practical question of European economic organisation. The vital question is how to preserve the spiritual inheritance of Europe…”1 These words were written by the excellent English historian, Christopher Dawson in his book Understanding Europe, published in 1951.

HUNGARY’S TRANSITION: LIBERALISM FOR THE FEW?

How can we explain the failure of Hungarian liberalism in a country that was expected to be a model of liberalisation? That is the basic question which Umut Korkut, the noted political scientist at Glasgow’s Caledonian University, discusses in his recent book on Hungarian politics. Liberalization Challenges in Hungary: Elitism, Progressivism

CONSERVATIVISM AND NATION-MODELS IN HUNGARY

Which has priority over the other, the Hungarian state or the Hungarian nation? Although the two concepts are closely related, they are unquestionably not the same. Consequently, it is quite legitimate to ask whether state building or nation building should be given preference. This question, however, cannot be answered without defining one’s position on the idea of the nation. Since