Boris Kálnoky

Boris Kálnoky

BORIS KÁLNOKY (Munich, 1961) grew up in Germany, the United States, Holland and France. His family left Hungary in 1947. He studied Politics and History in Hamburg and went on to work at the German daily Die Welt in 1987. In 1995, he became Balkans Correspondent for Die Welt, based in Budapest, and moved on in 2004 to become Middle East correspondent, based in Istanbul. He is the author of Ahnenland (Droemer Verlag, Munich, 2011), a book about what happened to his family and Hungary since 1952. He returned to Budapest in 2013, still for Die Welt. He also writes for a number of other media in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Since September 2020 he has been appointed Head of Media School at Mathias Corvinus Collegium, Budapest.

HEAVY LIFTING FOR THE GERMAN EU PRESIDENCY

“The EU is attempting to put final touches on three mega-projects, all of a transformative nature. A carbon-neutral transformation of economy, the ‘Next Generation Fund’ (NGF) to deal with the economic fallout of the coronavirus crisis, and the introduction of a ‘Rule of Law’ (RoL) mechanism all have the potential

THE RULE OF LAW DEBATE – CAN GERMANY GET HUNGARY OFF THE HOOK?

“‘Rule of Law’ has become the battle cry of our times in the arena of European politics. Accompanied by spectacular rhetorical theatrics of leading politicians whenever the media are around, the ‘RoL’, as it is often abbreviated, looks set to become the object of new EU rules aiming to discipline

GERMANY: THE DAM THAT BROKE

“The crisis is so severe that CDU Chairwoman Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer announced her resignation on 10 February (effective later this year). Also, she will not be the party’s candidate for Chancellor in the next elections. She had been handpicked and groomed by Chancellor Angela Merkel to become her successor. Who will

2020 – BIRTH OF A CONTINENTIAL EU

“Without the UK, the EU becomes a continental affair in which Germany’s relative weight will again increase. All eyes are on Berlin: how will Germany position itself? Historically, close cooperation between Germany and France has been the EU’s centre of gravity. But that may change. Particularly, the Visegrad countries of

A NAZI MURDER AND THE FALLOUT

“A neo-Nazi attack against a synagogue in the town of Halle, Eastern Germany, has shaken the Germany psyche. Two views have emerged about this. One is that the country is witnessing the return of rightwing terrorism with roots in Nazi violence of the 1920s and 1930s. The other is that

GERMANY: THE END OF STABILITY?

“Regional elections in Saxony and Brandenburg on 1 September illustrated where this will probably lead to: in both states the ruling parties CDU (in Saxony) and SPD (in Brandenburg) lost heavily and are now trying to include the Greens in a larger coalition. This may be exactly what lies ahead

HUNGARY’S ‘OPENING TO THE EAST’ AND TURKEY

There is huge potential in the East, but fantasy remains more exciting than reality. There will not be any buying of Hungarian bonds by Turkey, Azerbaijan or Kazakhstan. Growth in trade volumes stagnated this year. Most of Hungary’s exports to the East come from multinationals based in Hungary. In order

OUTPOST IN THE DESERT

How Hungary Represents the Western World in Tripoli There is a little known aspect to the Libyan war: as the West was busy trying to bring down the Ghadafi regime, Hungary continued to represent the western world in Ghadafi’s capital of Tripoli. As western planes bombed key installations in the

WHAT THE ARAB REVOLUTIONS MEANS FOR EAST CENTRAL EUROPE

The protest movement in the Arab world has been likened to the popular uprisings that brought down Communism in Eastern Europe in 1989. The EU, back then, rose to the challenge, embraced and supported the fledgling democracies with vast amounts of money, and ultimately rewarded the most reliably democracy-minded among

SOLID, EXPERIENCED WORK

When Hungary took over the EU Presidency on 1st January, it should have made for very satisfying news. The second Central European country to try its hand at the helm of the Union, to be followed by Poland later this year. The two countries that, together, brought down communism, will